9/11 Scholars Forum

Exposing Falsehoods and Revealing Truths

Getting to know about the Energy Requirements to demolish a Twin Tower - Check this table out from Wikipedia

Orders of magnitude (energy)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Different orders of magnitude of energy for solar, wind and global consumption

This list compares various energies in joules (J), organized by order of magnitude.


List of orders of magnitude for energy
Factor (Joules) SI prefix Value Item
10-31 3.0×10−31 J the average kinetic energy of a molecule at the lowest temperature reached as of 2003
10-24 yocto- (yJ)
10-23 1.5×10−23 J the average kinetic energy of a molecule in the Boomerang Nebula, the coldest place known outside of a laboratory, at a temperature of 1 kelvin
10−21 zepto- (zJ) 4.37×10−21 J the average kinetic energy of a molecule at room temperature
1.602×10−19 J ≈1 electronvolt (eV)
2.7×10−19 J – 5.2×10−19 J the energy range of photons in visible light
10−18 atto- (aJ) 5.0×10−18 J the upper bound of the mass-energy of a neutrino in particle physics
10−15 femto- (fJ)
10-14 5.0×10−14 J the upper bound of the mass-energy of a muon neutrino
8.187×10−14 J the rest mass-energy of an electron
10-13 1.602×10−13 J 1 megaelectronvolt (MeV)
10−12 pico- (pJ) 2.26×10−12 J kinetic energy of a D-T fusion neutron
10-11 3.2×10−11 J the average total energy released in the nuclear fission of one uranium-235 atom
3.5×10−11 J the average total energy released in the fission of one plutonium-239 atom
10-10 1.503×10−10 J the rest mass-energy of a proton
1.505×10−10 J the rest mass-energy of a neutron
1.602×10−10 J 1 gigaelectronvolt (GeV)
3.005×10−10 J the rest mass-energy of a deuteron
5.972×10−10 J the rest mass-energy of an alpha particle
10-9 nano- (nJ) 1.602×10−9 J 10 GeV
8×10−9 J the initial operating energy per beam of the CERN Large Electron Positron Collider in 1983
10-8 1.3×10−8 J the mass-energy of a W boson
1.5×10−8 J the mass-energy of a Z boson
1.602×10−8 J 100 GeV
4.3×10−8 J the operating energy per beam of the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron accelerator in 1981
10-7 1×10−7 J ≡ 1 erg
1.602×10−7 J one TeV (teraelectronvolt), about the kinetic energy of a flying mosquito[1]
10-6 micro- (µJ)
10-5 2×10−5 J the energy to pronounce an average syllable of a word[2]
3×10−5 J the energy of one second of moonlight falling upon a human face[2]
10-4 1.8×10−4 J the expected collision energy of lead nuclei in the CERN Large Hadron Collider [9]
9×10−4 J the energy of a cricket's chirp[2][dubious ]
10-3 milli- (mJ)
10-2 centi- (cJ)
10-1 deci- (dJ) 1×10−1 J the energy of an American half-dollar falling 1 metre
1x10-1 J the energy required to press a typewriter key[2]
100 J 1 J ≡ 1 N·m (newton-metre)
1 J ≡ 1 W·s (watt-second)
1 J the kinetic energy produced as a small apple (100 grams) falls one meter against Earth's gravity.
~1 J the amount of energy that a quiet person produces as heat, every hundredth of a second
1 J the energy required to heat one gram of dry, cool air by 1 degree Celsius
1.356 J ≈ 1 ft·lbf (foot-pound force)
4.184 J ≡ 1 thermochemical calorie (small calorie)
4.1868 J ≡ 1 International Table calorie (small calorie)
~5 J The energy stored in a disposable camera photoflash capacitor (100 µF @ 330 V).
8 J the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin theoretical upper limit for the energy of a cosmic ray
101 deca- (daJ) 5×101 J the most energetic cosmic ray ever detected, in 1991
8×101 J the kinetic energy of an average person swinging a baseball bat
102 hecto- (hJ) 6×102 J the use of a 10-watt flashlight for one minute[2]
7.457×102 J a power of one horsepower applied for one second
9×102 J the energy of a lethal dose of X-rays[2]
103 kilo- (kJ) 1×103 J the energy stored in a typical photography studio strobe light
1.05×103 J ≈ 1 British thermal unit (BTU), depending on the temperature
1.2×103 J the energy in shooting an elephant gun
1.366×103 J the total solar radiation received from the Sun by one square meter of the Earth's surface per second (this is the solar constant[10])
1.42×103 J the kinetic energy of a 3.5 g (grams) AK-74 bullet fired at 900 m/s (metres per second)[3]
1.69×103 J the kinetic energy of a 3.56 g gram M193 M16 bullet fired at 975 m/s (meters per second)
1.73×103 J the kinetic energy of a 4.0 g gram M855 M16 bullet fired at 930 m/s (meters per second)
3.28×103 J the kinetic energy of a 9.33 g NATO rifle cartridge fired at 838 m/s[3]
3.600×103 J ≡ 1 W·h (watt-hour)
4.184×103 J the energy released by explosion of one gram of TNT
4.186×103 J ≡ 1 food Calorie (large calorie)
104 1.7×104 J the energy released by the metabolism of one gram of sugar or protein
3.8×104 J the energy released by the metabolism of one gram of fat
5.0×104 J the energy released by the combustion of one gram of gasoline
105 2×105 J—9×105 J the average kinetic energy of an automobile at highway speeds
9×105 J the energy required to accelerate a 4-ton truck up to highway speeds[2]
106 mega- (MJ) 1×106 J the kinetic energy of a one tonne vehicle at 45 metres per second (100 miles per hour)
1×106 J approximately the food energy of a snack such as a Mars bar
3.6×106 J = 1 kilowatt-hour (electricity consumption)
6.3×106 J the recommended food energy intake per day for a woman not doing heavy labour
8.4×106 J the recommended food energy intake per day for a man
107 1×107 J the energy of a day's worth of heavy labour[2]
108 1×108 J the kinetic energy of a 55 tonne aircraft at typical landing speed (59 m/s or 115 knots)
1.05×108 J ≈ 1 therm, depending on the temperature
7.25×108 J ≈ energy from burning 16 kilograms of oil (using 135 kg per barrel of light crude)
109 giga- (GJ) 1.2x109 J the theoretical minimum amount of energy required to melt a tonne of steel (25 °C to 1523 °C, equivalent to 330 kW·h)
1.5×109 J the energy in an average lightning bolt
1.6×109 J the magnetic stored energy in the world's largest toroidal superconducting magnet for the ATLAS experiment at CERN, Geneva
1.95627185×109 J Planck energy, the unit of energy in Planck units[4]
2.5×109 J the approximate average amount of energy expended by a human heart muscle over an 80-year lifetime
3.2×109 J the approximate annual energy usage of a standard clothes dryer
6.12×109 J ≈ 1 bboe (barrel of oil equivalent)[5]
1010 2.3×1010 J the kinetic energy of an Airbus A380 at cruising speed (560 tonnes at 562 knots or 289 m/s)
4.19×1010 J ≈ 1 toe (ton of oil equivalent)[5]
5×1010 J the yield energy of a MOAB (Massive Ordnance Air Blast) bomb, the second most powerful non-nuclear weapon ever designed (after the Russian Father of All Bombs)
7.2×1010 J the energy consumed by the average U.S. automobile in the year 2000
8.64×1010 J ≈ 1 MW·d (megawatt-day), used in the context of power plants
1011
1012 tera- (TJ) 3.6×1012 J the average orbital kinetic energy of the Mir space station (124 tonnes at about 7680 m/s)
8.2×1012 J the orbital kinetic energy of the International Space Station (277 tonnes at 7710 m/s)
1013 1×1013 J the energy of the maximum fuel an Airbus A380 can carry (248 tonnes of Jet A-1 at 43.15 MJ per kg)
3.6×1013 J released by an average thunderstorm
6.3×1013 J the approximate yield of the Little Boy atomic bomb detonated over Hiroshima, Japan at the end of World War II (see the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki)[11]
8.78×1013 J the yield of the Fat Man atomic bomb detonated by the United States of America over Nagasaki, Japan at the end of World War II[6]
9.0×1013 J the theoretical total mass-energy of one gram of matter
1014 6×1014 J the energy released by an average hurricane in one second
1015 peta- (PJ) 2.07×1015 J the yearly electricity production in Togo, Africa as of 2005[7]
4.184×1015 J the amount of energy in 1 megaton of TNT
1016 1.0×1016 J the estimated impact energy released in forming Meteor Crater
4.42×1016 J the yearly electricity consumption in Zimbabwe as of 2005[7]
8.988×1016 J the amount of energy in 1 kilogram of antimatter (or of matter)
1017 1.1×1017 J the surface energy of the 2004 Indian Ocean Earthquake
1.74×1017 J the total energy from the Sun that strikes the face of the Earth each second[8]
1.8×1017 J the amount of energy from annihilating 1 kilogram of antimatter with 1 kilogram of matter
2.1×1017 J the yield of the Tsar Bomba, the largest nuclear weapon ever tested
4.10×1017 J the yearly electricity consumption of Norway as of 2005[7]
4.184×1017 J 100 megatons, a potential nuclear weapon yield[2]
8.4×1017 J the estimated energy released by the eruption of the Indonesian volcano, Krakatoa, in 1883[9]
1018 exa- (EJ) 12.75x1018 J (Star Trek) the energy output per second of the fictional starship USS Enterprise NCC-1701-D.
1019 1.37×1019 J the yearly electricity consumption in the U.S. as of 2005[7]
1.46×1019J the yearly electricity production in the U.S. as of 2005[10]
5.2×1019 J the daily energy released by an average hurricane producing rain (400 times greater than the wind energy).[11]
5.67×1019 J the yearly electricity consumption of the world as of 2005[7]
6.25×1019 J the yearly electricity generation of the world as of 2005[12]
6.66×1019 J the total energy released by the magnitude 8.8 2010 Chile Earthquake
1020 4.37x1020 J Total World Annual Energy consumption (15TW years)
8.01×1020 J estimated global uranium resources for generating electricity 2005.[13][14][15][16]
1021 zetta- (ZJ) 6.5×1021 J the estimated energy contained in the world's natural gas reserves as of 2006[17]
7.4×1021 J the estimated energy contained in the world's petroleum reserves as of 2003
1022 1.5×1022J the total energy from the Sun that strikes the face of the Earth each day[8]
2.1×1022 J the estimated energy contained in the world's coal reserves as of 2005[18]
2.9×1022 J identified global uranium-238 resources using fast reactor technology.[13]
3.9×1022 J the estimated energy contained in the world's fossil fuel reserves as of 2003
4×1022 J the estimated total energy released by the 2004 Indian Ocean Earthquake, equivalent to approximately 9.5 Teratons of TNT
1023 2.2×1023 J total global uranium-238 resources using fast reactor technology.[13]
5.0×1023 J the approximate energy released in the formation of the Chicxulub Crater in the Yucatán Peninsula[19]
1024 yotta- (YJ) 5.5×1024 J the total energy from the Sun that strikes the face of the Earth each year[8]
1025
1026 1.25×1026 J conservative estimate of the energy released by the impact that created the Caloris basin on Mercury
3.86×1026 J the total energy output of the Sun each second[20]
1027
1028 3.856×1028 J the kinetic energy of the Moon in its orbit around the Earth
1029 2.58×1029 J rotational energy of the Earth
1030
1031 3.34×1031 J the total energy output of the Sun each day[20]
1032 2.24×1032 J the gravitational binding energy of the Earth[21]
1033 2.7×1033 J the Earth's kinetic energy in its orbit[22]
1034 1.22×1034 J the total energy output of the Sun each year[20]
1041 5.37×1041 J the theoretical total mass-energy of the Earth
6.87×1041 J the gravitational binding energy of the Sun[21]
1044 1.2×1044 J the estimated energy released in a supernova[23]
1046 1×1046 J the estimated energy released in a hypernova
1051 1×1047 J the energy released in an intense gamma ray burst
1.8×1047 J the theoretical total mass-energy of the Sun
1058 4×1058 J the visible mass-energy in our galaxy, the Milky Way
1059 1×1059 J the total mass-energy of the galaxy, including dark matter and dark energy
1062 1.8×1062 J the total mass-energy of the Local Supercluster. including dark matter[24]
1069 4×1069 J the estimated total mass-energy of the observable universe

Views: 113

Comment

You need to be a member of 9/11 Scholars Forum to add comments!

Join 9/11 Scholars Forum

© 2019   Created by James H. Fetzer.   Powered by

Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service